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Association between chlorhexidine gluconate concentrations and resistant bacterial bioburden on skin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2019

Gita Nadimpalli
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Lyndsay M. O’Hara
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Surbhi Leekha
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
David P. Calfee
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
Loren G. Miller
Affiliation:
LA Biomedical Research Center at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California
Lisa Pineles
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Natalia Blanco
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
J. Kristie Johnson
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Anthony D. Harris*
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
*
Author for correspondence: Dr Anthony Harris, Email: aharris@epi.umaryland.edu

Abstract

We studied the association between chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) concentration on skin and resistant bacterial bioburden. CHG was almost always detected on the skin, and detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus on skin sites was infrequent. However, we found no correlation between CHG concentration and bacterial bioburden.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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References

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