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Antimicrobial therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria or candiduria in advanced cancer patients transitioning to comfort measures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2019

Rupak Datta*
Affiliation:
Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Tianyun Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
Mojun Zhu
Affiliation:
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Louise Marie Dembry
Affiliation:
Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
Ling Han
Affiliation:
Section of Geriatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Heather Allore
Affiliation:
Section of Geriatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
Vincent Quagliarello
Affiliation:
Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Manisha Juthani-Mehta
Affiliation:
Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
*
Author for correspondence: Rupak Datta, Email: rupak.datta@yale.edu

Abstract

Among 300 advanced cancer patients with potential urinary tract infection (UTI), 19 had symptomatic UTI. Among remaining patients (n = 281), 21% had asymptomatic bacteriuria or candiduria, and 14% received inappropriate therapy for 279 antimicrobial days. Bacteriuria or candiduria predicted antimicrobial therapy. At 10,000 to <100,000 CFU/mL, the incidence rate ratio [IRR] was 16.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.0–47.2), and at ≥100,000 CFU/mL, the IRR was 27.9 (95% CI, 10.9–71.2).

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

a

Authors of equal contribution.

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: This work was presented in part in the session on Antimicrobial Stewardship: Special Populations (presentation #248) at IDWeek 2018, on October 4, 2018, in San Francisco, California.

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