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Still Too POSH to Push for Structural Change? The Need for a Macropsychology Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2017

Malcolm MacLachlan*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Maynooth University
*
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Malcolm MacLachlan, Department of Psychology, Maynooth University, County Kildare, Ireland. E-mail: Mac.MacLachlan@nuim.ie

Extract

My mother, who lived her early years in the British Raj in India, assures me that POSH referred to the well-to-do European's wish to travel “Port Out, Starboard Home” on ships to and from India, which meant enjoying the predominantly shaded side of the ship, protected from the ravaging heat that “ordinary” folk had to endure. What an apt, provocative, and profound analogy Gloss, Carr, Reichman, Abdul-Nasiru, and Oestereich (2017) have given us in their description of the primary focus of industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology on “Professional, Official, Secure, and High income” work.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2017 

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References

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