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A Missing Link in Gloss et al. (“From Handmaidens to POSH Humanitarians”)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2017

John E. S. Lawrence
Affiliation:
School of International & Public Affairs, Columbia University
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Extract

Among many salient shifts in international development research over the last few decades has been growing legitimacy in recognition/documentation of the “rise of the South” as noted in the UNDP Human Development Report (2013). This has redirected both research and practice beyond just Northern (read “Western”) approaches, opened up new resource flows for “Southern” institutions, and initiated a whole new set of initiatives around “South–South” cooperation (Malik, 2014). To Mahbub ul Haq's original theme of “enlarging people's choices” were added new dimensions of looking beyond just western economies (and solely “economistic” analysis and prescriptions) for solutions to existential threats to sustainable development among the world's poorer nations (UNDP, 1990, p. 9). Fundamental shifts such as these, epitomized in Mahbub's well-known statement on human capacity, provide the basis for the focal article by Gloss, Carr, Reichman, Abdul-Nasiru, and Oestereich (2017) that builds skillfully on a framework, which of course also calls on Amartya Sen's work (so closely aligned with and influential in the Human Development Report series). The result is an original, carefully argued, and, perhaps some will agree, long overdue article synching the broad discipline of modern industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology into a more realistic awareness of how the majority of the world's populations sustain their livelihoods. However, there is a crucial “space” that I-O psychology seems to be still missing, and one barely touched on by this article, and that is the macropolicy environment that brings institutions in government and civil society together in more strategic approaches to developing human “resourcefulness.”

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2017 

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References

Gloss, A., Carr, S. C., Reichman, W., Abdul-Nasiru, I., & Oestereich, W. T. (2017). From handmaidens to POSH humanitarians: The case for making human capabilities the business of I-O psychology. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 10 (3), 329–369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hopkins, M. (2016). CSR & sustainability: From the margins to the mainstream. Sheffield, UK: Greenleaf.Google Scholar
Hopkins, M., & Lawrence, J. E. S. (2016). CSR and UN's SDGs: The role of the private sector. Retrieved from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/csr-uns-sdgs-role-private-sector-profs-michael-hopkins-hopkins.Google Scholar
Lawrence, J. E. S. (2013). Human resources and sustainable development. In Proceedings of the Baku Humanitarian Forum (pp. 295309). Baku, Azerbaijan. Retrieved from http://bakuforum.az/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/book_2013_ru_2.pdf Google Scholar
Malik, K. (2014). Safeguarding human progress: Reducing vulnerabilities and building resilience. New York: UNDP Human Development Report Office.Google Scholar
Sen, A. (2000). Development as freedom. New York: Anchor Books.Google Scholar
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). (1990). Human development report. New York: UNDP Human Development Report Office.Google ScholarPubMed
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). (2013). Human development report. New York: UNDP Human Development Report Office.Google ScholarPubMed

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