Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-klmjj Total loading time: 0.16 Render date: 2021-09-20T07:24:04.284Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 March 2020

Abstract

Rationalism is the key to the connected oppressions of women and nature in the West. Deep ecology has failed to provide an adequate historical perspective or an adequate challenge to human/nature dualism. A relational account of self enables us to reject an instrumental view of nature and develop an alternative based on respect without denying that nature is distinct from the self. This shift of focus links feminist, environmentalist, and certain forms of socialist critiques. The critique of anthropocentrism is not sacrificed, as deep ecologists argue, but enriched.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Hypatia, Inc.

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Benhabib, Seyla. 1987. The generalised and the concrete other. In Women and moral theory, 154–77. Kittay, E. and Meyers, D. eds. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman and Allenheld.Google Scholar
Benhabib, Seyla and Cornell, Drucilla, eds. 1987. Feminism as critique. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press; Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
Benjamin, Jessica. 1985. The bonds of love: Rational violence and erotic domination. In The future of difference. Eisenstein, H. and Jardine, A. eds. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
Berman, Marshall. 1982. All that is solid melts into air: The experience of modernity. New York: Simon & Schuster; London: Penguin.Google Scholar
Biehl, Janet. 1987. It's deep, but is it broad? An ecofeminist looks at deep ecology. Kick It Over special supplement (Winter).Google Scholar
Blum, Lawrence A. 1980. Friendship, altruism and morality. Boston and London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Callicott, J. Baird. 1985. Intrinsic value, quantum theory, and environmental ethics. Environmental Ethics 7: 261–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheney, Jim. 1987. Ecofeminism and deep ecology. Environmental Ethics 9:115145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheney, Jim. 1989. The neo‐stoicism of radical environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 11: 293325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chodorow, Nancy. 1979. The reproduction of mothering. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Chodorow, Nancy. 1985. Gender, relation and difference in psychoanalytic perspective. In The future of difference, 319. Eisenstein, H. and Jardine, A. eds. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
Collard, Andrée. 1988. Rape of the wild: Man's violence against animals and the earth. Bloomington: Indiana University Press; London: The Woman's Press.Google Scholar
Cook, Francis. 1977. Hua‐Yen Buddhism: The jewel net of Indra. Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press. 118119.Google Scholar
Eckersley, Robyn. 1989. Divining evolution: The ecological ethics of Murray Bookchin. Environmental Ethics 11: 99116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fox, Warwick. 1982. The intuition of deep ecology. Paper presented at Environment, Ethics and Ecology Conference, Canberra. Also published under the title Deep ecology: A new philosophy of our time? The Ecologist 14(1984): 194200.Google Scholar
Fox, Warwick. 1986. Approaching deep ecology: A response to Richard Sylvan's critique of deep ecology. Envirnomental Studies Occasional Paper 20. Hobart: University of Tasmania Centre for Environmental Studies.Google Scholar
Fox, Warwick. 1989. The deep ecology‐ecofeminism debate and its parallels. Environmental Ethics 11: 525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fox, Warwick. 1990. Towards a transpersonal ecology: Developing new foundations for environmentalism. Boston: Shambala.Google Scholar
Gearhart, Sally Miller. 1982. The Future‐‐‐if there is one‐‐‐is female. In Reweaving the web of life, 266285. McAllister, P., ed. Philadelphia and Santa Cruz: New Society Publishers.Google Scholar
Gilligan, Carol. 1982. In a different voice. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Gilligan, Carol. 1987. Moral orientation and moral development. In Women and moral theory, 1933. Kittay, E. and Meyers, D. eds. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman and Allenheld.Google Scholar
Griffin, Susan. 1978. Woman and nature: The roaring inside her. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
Grimshaw, Jean. 1986. Philosophy and feminist thinking. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Also published as Feminist philosophers. Brighton: Wheatsheaf.Google Scholar
Griscom, Joan L. 1981. On healing the nature/history split in feminist thought. Heresies 4(1): 49.Google Scholar
Jaggar, Alison. 1983. Feminist politics and human nature. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Allenheld; Brighton: Harvester.Google Scholar
Kheel, Marti. 1985. The liberation of nature: A circular affair. Environmental Ethics 7: 135–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, Ynestra. 1981. Feminism and revolt. Heresies 4(1): 1216.Google Scholar
King, Ynestra. 1989. The ecology of feminism and the feminism of ecology. In Healing the wounds. Plant, J., ed., Philadelphia and Santa Cruz: New Society Publishers.Google Scholar
Leopold, Aldo. 1949. A sand county almanac, 201–2. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Lloyd, Genevieve. 1983a. Public reason and private passion. Metaphilosophy 14: 308–26.Google Scholar
Lloyd, Genevieve. 1983b. Reason, gender and morality in the history of philosophy. Social Research 50(3): 490513.Google Scholar
Lloyd, Genevieve. 1984. The man of reason. London: Methuen.Google Scholar
McLuhan, T. C., ed. 1973. Touch the earth. London: Abacus.Google Scholar
Miller, Jean Baker. 1976, 1978. Toward a new psychology of women. Boston: Beacon Press; London: Pelican.Google Scholar
Midgley, Mary. 1983. Animals and why they matter. Athens: University of Georgia Press; London: Penguin.Google Scholar
Naess, Arne. 1973. The shallow and the deep, long‐range ecology movement: A summary. Inquiry 16: 95100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Naess, Arne. 1986. Intrinsic value: Will the defenders of nature please rise. In Conservation Biology. Soule, M., ed. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates.Google Scholar
Naess, Arne. 1988. Ecology, community and lifestyle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Neidjie, Bill. 1985. Kakadu man. With S. Davis and A. Fox. Canberra: Mybrood P/L.Google Scholar
Neidjie, Bill and Taylor, Keith, eds. 1989. Story about feeling. Wyndham: Magabala Books.Google Scholar
Nicholson, Linda J. 1983. Women, morality and history. Social Research 50(3): 514–36.Google Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1975. Critical notice of Passmore's Man's responsibility for nature. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 53(2): 171–85.Google Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1980. Social theories, self‐management and environmental problems. In Environmental Philosophy, 217332. Mannison, D., McRobbie, M., and Routley, R. eds. Canberra: ANU Department of Philosophy Monograph Series RSSS.Google Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1986. Ecofeminism: an overview and discussion of positions and arguments. In Women and philosophy, Supplement to vol. 64 Australasian Journal of Philosophy (June 1986): 120–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1988, 1990. Women, humanity and nature. Radical Philosophy 48:624. Reprinted in Feminism, socialism and philosophy: a radical philosophy reader. S. Sayers, ed. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1989. Do we need a sex/gender distinction? Radical Philosophy 51:211.Google Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1990. Plato and the bush. Meanjin 49(3): 524–36.Google Scholar
Plumwood, Val. 1991. Ethics and instrumentalism: A Response to Janna Thompson. Environmental Ethics. Forthcoming.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Poole, Ross. 1984. Reason, self‐interest and “commercial society”: The social content of Kantian morality. Critical Philosophy 1: 2446.Google Scholar
Poole, Ross. 1985. Morality, masculinity and the market. Radical Philosophy 39: 1623.Google Scholar
Poole, Ross. 1990. Modernity, rationality and “the masculine.” In Femininity/Masculinity and representation. Threadgold, T. and Cranny‐Francis, A. eds. Sydney: George Allen and Unwin, 1990.Google Scholar
Regan, Tom. 1986. The case for animal rights. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Relph, Edward. 1976. Place and placelessness. London: Pion.Google Scholar
Relph, Edward. 1981. Rational lanscapes and humanistic geography. London: Croom Helm.Google Scholar
Rodman, John. 1980. Paradigm change in political science. American Behavioural Scientist 24(1): 5455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruether, Rosemary Radford. 1975. New woman new earth. Minneapolis: Seabury Press.Google Scholar
Salleh, Ariel. 1984. deeper than deep ecology. Environmental Ethics 6: 339–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seed, John. 1989. Interviewed by Pat Stone. Mother Earth News (May/June).Google Scholar
Seed, John, Macy, Joanna, Fleming, Pat, and Naess, Arne. 1988. Thinking like a mountain: Towards a council of all beings Philadelphia and Santa Cruz: New Society Publishers.Google Scholar
Sylvan, Richard. 1985. A critique of deep ecology. Radical Philosophy 40 and 41.Google Scholar
Taylor, Paul. 1986. Respect for nature. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Aquinas, Thomas. 1976. Summa contra Gentiles. Bk. 3, Pt. 2, chap. 62. Quoted in Animal rights and human obligations, 56. Regan, T. and Singer, P. eds. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Thompson, Janna. 1990. A refutation of environmental ethics. Environmental Ethics 12(2): 147–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Warren, Karen J. 1987. Feminism and ecology: Making connections. Environmental Ethics 9: 1718.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Warren, Karen J. 1990. The power and promise of ecological feminism. Environmental Ethics 12(2): 121–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zimmerman, Michael E. 1987. Feminism, deep ecology, and environmental ethics. Environmental Ethics 9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
129
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *