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Article contents

Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2020

Abstract

Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks “naturalizing” it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.

Type
Symposium On Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Hypatia, Inc.

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