Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.187 Render date: 2021-10-23T19:08:42.840Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

An Historian’s Theory of Social Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2019

Abstract:

The article argues that the concept of “claims-making” has been an important and influential thread in the work of Frederick Cooper. It explores the utility and advantages – as well as the characteristic rigor – of this theory of social change and what it implies. It then turns to the potential limits of its adoption within Africanist historiography and African Studies more broadly.

Résumé:

Cet article affirme que le concept de “revendication” a été un fil conducteur important et influent dans les travaux de Frederick Cooper. Il explore l’utilité et les avantages - ainsi que la rigueur caractéristique - de cette théorie du changement social et de ce qu’elle implique. Il aborde ensuite les limites potentielles de son adoption dans le cadre de l’historiographie africaniste et des études africanistes au sens large.

Type
Frederick Cooper and the Historiography of Africa
Copyright
© African Studies Association 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Cooper, Frederick, From Slaves to Squatters: Plantation Slavery and Agriculture in Zanzibar and Coastal Kenya, 1890–1925 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1980).Google Scholar
Cooper, Frederick, “Work, Class and Empire: An African Historian’s Retrospective on E.P. Thompson,” Social History 20–2 (1995), 235241.Google Scholar
Cooper, Frederick, Decolonization and African Society: The Labor Question in French and British Africa (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996).Google Scholar
Cooper, Frederick, Colonialism in Question: Theory, Knowledge, History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005).Google Scholar
Cooper, Frederick, “Alternatives to Empire: France and Africa after World War II,” in: Douglas, Howland and White, Luise (eds.), The State of Sovereignty: Territories, Laws, Populations (Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2009), 94123.Google Scholar
Cooper, Frederick, “Writing the History of Development,” Journal of Modern European History 8–1 (2010), 523.Google Scholar
Cooper, Frederick, Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014).Google Scholar
Ferguson, James, Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution (Durham NC: Duke University Press, 2015).Google Scholar
Guèye, Omar, Sénégal: Histoire du mouvement syndical, la marche vers le Code du Travail (Paris: l’Harmattan, 2012).Google Scholar
Hall, Bruce, “Bellah Histories of Decolonization, Iklan Paths to Freedom: the Meanings of Race and Slavery in the Late-Colonial Niger Bend (Mali), 1944–1960,” International Journal of African Historical Studies 44–1 (2011), 6187.Google Scholar
Klein, Martin, Slavery and Colonial Rule in French West Africa (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998).Google Scholar
Sewell, William H Jr.., The Logics of History: Social Theory and Social Transformation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005).Google Scholar
Stephens, Rhiannon, “Poverty’s Pasts: A Case for Longue Durée Studies,” Journal of African History 59–3 (2018), 399409.Google Scholar
Thomas, Lynn, “Historicising Agency,” Gender & History 26–2 (2016), 324339.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

An Historian’s Theory of Social Change
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

An Historian’s Theory of Social Change
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

An Historian’s Theory of Social Change
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *