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Occurrence of the eudemersal radiodont Cambroraster in the early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the diversity of hurdiid ecomorphotypes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2020

Yu Liu*
Affiliation:
Yunnan Key Laboratory for Palaeobiology, Yunnan University, North Cuihu Road 2, 650091, Kunming, China MEC International Joint Laboratory for Palaeobiology and Palaeoenvironment, Yunnan University, 650091, Kunming, China
Rudy Lerosey-Aubril
Affiliation:
Museum of Comparative Zoology and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA
Denis Audo
Affiliation:
Yunnan Key Laboratory for Palaeobiology, Yunnan University, North Cuihu Road 2, 650091, Kunming, China MEC International Joint Laboratory for Palaeobiology and Palaeoenvironment, Yunnan University, 650091, Kunming, China
Dayou Zhai
Affiliation:
Yunnan Key Laboratory for Palaeobiology, Yunnan University, North Cuihu Road 2, 650091, Kunming, China MEC International Joint Laboratory for Palaeobiology and Palaeoenvironment, Yunnan University, 650091, Kunming, China
Huijuan Mai
Affiliation:
Yunnan Key Laboratory for Palaeobiology, Yunnan University, North Cuihu Road 2, 650091, Kunming, China MEC International Joint Laboratory for Palaeobiology and Palaeoenvironment, Yunnan University, 650091, Kunming, China
Javier Ortega-Hernández*
Affiliation:
Museum of Comparative Zoology and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA
*
Authors for correspondence: Yu Liu, yu.liu@ynu.edu.cn; Javier Ortega-Hernández, jortegahernandez@fas.harvard.edu
Authors for correspondence: Yu Liu, yu.liu@ynu.edu.cn; Javier Ortega-Hernández, jortegahernandez@fas.harvard.edu

Abstract

Radiodonts are a diverse clade of Lower Palaeozoic stem-group euarthropods that played a key role in the emergence of complex marine trophic webs. The latest addition to the group, Cambroraster falcatus, was recently described from the Wuliuan Burgess Shale, and is characterized by a unique horseshoe-shaped central carapace element. Here we report the discovery of Cambroraster sp. nov. A, a new species from the Cambrian Stage 3 Chengjiang Lagerstätte of South China. The new occurrence of Cambroraster demonstrates that some of the earliest known radiodonts had already evolved a highly derived carapace morphology adapted to an essentially eudemersal life as sediment foragers.

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Rapid Communication
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© Cambridge University Press 2020

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Occurrence of the eudemersal radiodont Cambroraster in the early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the diversity of hurdiid ecomorphotypes
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