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On the relationship between heterochromatization and variegation in Drosophila, with special reference to temperature sensitive periods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Ingeborg J. Hartmann-Goldstein
Affiliation:
Department of Genetics, University of Sheffield, U.K.
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Using a strain of D. melanogaster carrying an X-4 translocation, comparison between groups of individuals cultured at 14°, 19° and 25°C. showed good correlation between heterochromatization, variegation in malpighian tubules and Notch. All these phenomena are enhanced by low temperatures. Correlation was less good within each temperature group, and considerable variability was observed between individuals within the group, and between nuclei from one individual.

Experiments involving a temperature change during the embryonic period indicate that (1) heterochromatization is especially temperature-sensitive during the early embryonic period but may be increased by low temperature later, (2) larval malpighian tubules are sensitive to temperature only during the early embryonic stage, and (3) N is influenced by temperature during early embryonic life and also during the larval period.

Our observations, in conjunction with those of other workers, could be explained as follows: exposure of individuals to low temperature at a time when a specific system is beginning to differentiate will cause the processes concerned to be blocked in some cells. At least during the early embryonic stages this appears to involve heterochromatization of the relevant locus. Once the processes are established which will lead to the formation of a character, further heterochromatization has no effect on the phenotype. Temperature may affect pupal or adult phenotype in this way or by a direct action on the metabolic processes of cells.

Further experiments showed: (1) the greatest temperature-sensitivity of all three phenomena within the first 6 hours of embryonic life; (2) striking fluctuations of the effect of temperature, especially within the early embryonic period; (3) close correspondence between all three phenomena in time of response to temperature. Some alternative interpretations are considered.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1967

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