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Heterokaryon studies of the cytoplasmic mutant SG in Neurospora*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

John E. Puhalla
Affiliation:
Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
Adrian M. Srb
Affiliation:
Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
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Heterokaryons were made between a cytoplasmic variant of Neurospora called SG, which shows a slow growth rate, and normal strains. Fusions were made in such a way that the fate of the protoplasmic mixes in individual hyphae could be followed. A semi-quantitative analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic migration along established hyphae was possible. Apparently, components of SG and normal cytoplasms are able to associate intimately in a single hyphal segment and later segregate intact. More often, however, an interaction of cytoplasms occurs which results in a new stable cytoplasmic type called slow SG. It is postulated the cytoplasmic determinants of SG are particulate and that the slow SG strains are the result of reassortment of the SG factor with other autonomous cytoplasmic entities. Acriflavine in the proper concentration inhibits and kills SG strains on solid medium without affecting normal strains. The acriflavine is most effective against germinating spores. The SG phenotype is redefined on the basis of this sensitivity to acriflavine.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1967

References

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Heterokaryon studies of the cytoplasmic mutant SG in Neurospora*
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