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Genetic analysis of the Y-chromosome of the mouse: evidence for two loci affecting androgen metabolism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Jaswant K. Jutley
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Pathology, University of Leeds, Old Medical School, Leeds LS2 9NL
Alistair D. Stewart
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Pathology, University of Leeds, Old Medical School, Leeds LS2 9NL
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Summary

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Male mice from congenic lines carry Y-chromosomes derived from two pairs of inbred strains (CBA/FaCamSt and C57BL/FaSt; PHL/St and PHL-YH/St) on various genetic backgrounds were compared. Serum testosterone levels, and the response of target organs in castrated animals to graded doses of exogenous testerone propionate were measured. These comparisons produced evidence for two Y-chromosomal loci influencing androgen metabolism. One of these affects serum testosterone levels, with variant alleles on the Y-chromosomes derived from the PHL and PHL-YH strains. The other locus influences the response to testosterone of target organs, most significantly seminal vesicle, and variant alleles are found in the CBA and C57 strains. The effects of both loci are modulated by the genetic background. The relationship of these loci to other Y-chromosomal loci in the mouse is briefly discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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