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The genes for two neuromuscular diseases of the mouse, ‘arrested development of righting response’, adr, and ‘myotonia’, mto, are allelic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Harald Jockusch*
Affiliation:
Developmental Biology Unit, University of Bielefeld, POB 8640, D-4800 Bielefeld 1, F.R.G.
Kordula Bertram
Affiliation:
Developmental Biology Unit, University of Bielefeld, POB 8640, D-4800 Bielefeld 1, F.R.G.
Susanne Schenk
Affiliation:
Developmental Biology Unit, University of Bielefeld, POB 8640, D-4800 Bielefeld 1, F.R.G.
*
* Corresponding author.
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Two hitherto unmapped recessive autosomal mutations, ‘arrested development of righting response’ (adr) and ‘myotonia’ (mto, now adrmto), were found to be allelic, so that preliminary linkage data on adr and adrmto can now be combined. No linkage was found to the glucose phosphate isomerase (Gpi-1) locus on Chr 7 that marks a region of homology between mouse Chr 7 and human Chr 19, and in man is closely linked to the myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene. The adr gene was expressed on diverse genetic backgrounds including the athymic nude mouse.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

References

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The genes for two neuromuscular diseases of the mouse, ‘arrested development of righting response’, adr, and ‘myotonia’, mto, are allelic
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