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Effects of alleles at the agouti locus on minor skeletal variants in C57BL/6 house mice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Larry Leamy
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, California State University, Long Beach, California 90840
David Bradley
Affiliation:
Academic Computing Services, California State University, Long Beach, California 90840
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In this study, five separate alleles at the agouti locus in house mice were tested for potential effects on a battery of 13 minor skeletal variants. Six genotypes (aa, ata, atat, Aa, Avya, and Aya) were compared on a standard congenic background (C57BL/6). In log-linear analyses, three of the 13 characters showed significant genotype differences (another three were close to significance), and genotypes also exhibited overall significance in a multivariate randomization test. Both multidimensional scaling and clustering showed an association of aa with ata, Aa with Avya and Aya, and a general separation of atat from the other genotypes. Genotype differences averaged 0·63 in probit standard deviations, 0·09 when assessed by the mean measure of divergence. Since the general magnitude of effects of these major genes was quite similar to those previously estimated for presumptive polygenes from subline divergence studies, it was concluded that major genes may often act as polygenes and make important contributions to the variation in minor skeletal variants.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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Effects of alleles at the agouti locus on minor skeletal variants in C57BL/6 house mice
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