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Role of microRNAs in immunity and organ transplantation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 December 2011

Janine C. Spiegel
Affiliation:
Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies (IMTTS), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
Johan M. Lorenzen
Affiliation:
Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies (IMTTS), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
Thomas Thum*
Affiliation:
Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies (IMTTS), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author: Thomas Thum, Institute of Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany. E-mail: Thum.Thomas@mh-hannover.de

Abstract

Organ transplantation has evolved rapidly and there is now widespread use of donated organs for the treatment of end-stage organ failure. Although the therapeutic options achieving long-term graft survival have improved, acute and chronic rejections are still a major problem. Studies to identify noninvasive biomarkers for rejection and underlying molecular events have increased significantly in the past decade, but a major breakthrough is still missing. The recent discovery of small regulatory RNA molecules (microRNAs) resulted in a new and improved understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation and also led to the development of the first new microRNA (miRNA)-based therapies. miRNAs are endogenous, single-stranded RNAs consisting of about 19–25 noncoding nucleotides, which have an important role in regulating gene expression. Additionally, circulating miRNAs that might be useful as novel disease biomarkers were detected. Here, we summarise current knowledge about the role of miRNAs in immunology and transplantation medicine and their role as potential biomarkers. We also focus on the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications of the use of miRNA-based therapeutic strategies to improve long-term allograft survival.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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