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EFFECTS OF VARIATIONS IN DIETARY CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS SUPPLY ON PLASMA AND BONE OSTEOCALCIN CONCENTRATIONS AND BONE MINERALIZATION IN GROWING PIGS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2001

M. L. F. Nicodemo
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK
D. Scott
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK
W. Buchan
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK
A. Duncan
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK
S. P. Robins
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK
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Abstract

Growing pigs were fed diets supplying 45 % (low), 70 % (intermediate) and 100 % (high) recommended dietary allowances of calcium (the Ca:P ratio was kept constant), but otherwise adequate in nutrients. The effects of varying calcium and phosphorus intakes on bone and plasma osteocalcin were monitored. Mineral content of the diet did not affect feed conversion and live weight gain. Plasma phosphorus concentrations decreased significantly in pigs fed a low mineral diet compared with those fed the high mineral diet, but there were no changes in plasma calcium and osteocalcin concentrations. Bones from the low mineral group had marked reductions in dry matter, calcium and phosphorus contents, as well as increased collagen, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline concentrations: osteocalcin concentrations in bone were unaffected by treatment. The results showed no direct link between osteocalcin and the degree of bone mineralization.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Physiological Society 1998

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EFFECTS OF VARIATIONS IN DIETARY CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS SUPPLY ON PLASMA AND BONE OSTEOCALCIN CONCENTRATIONS AND BONE MINERALIZATION IN GROWING PIGS
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EFFECTS OF VARIATIONS IN DIETARY CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS SUPPLY ON PLASMA AND BONE OSTEOCALCIN CONCENTRATIONS AND BONE MINERALIZATION IN GROWING PIGS
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EFFECTS OF VARIATIONS IN DIETARY CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS SUPPLY ON PLASMA AND BONE OSTEOCALCIN CONCENTRATIONS AND BONE MINERALIZATION IN GROWING PIGS
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