Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-xvx2z Total loading time: 0.251 Render date: 2021-07-27T00:48:46.056Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

PHYTOSOCIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WEEDS AS A FUNCTION OF RESIDUAL HERBICIDES APPLIED TO RICE GROWN UNDER SPRINKLER IRRIGATION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2017

G. CONCENÇO
Affiliation:
Embrapa Clima Temperado, Experimental Station Terras Baixas, Pelotas RS, Brazil
A. ANDRES
Affiliation:
Embrapa Clima Temperado, Experimental Station Terras Baixas, Pelotas RS, Brazil
G. M. TELÓ
Affiliation:
Embrapa Clima Temperado, Experimental Station Terras Baixas, Pelotas RS, Brazil
M. B. MARTINS
Affiliation:
Embrapa Clima Temperado, Experimental Station Terras Baixas, Pelotas RS, Brazil
I. S. MOISINHO
Affiliation:
Embrapa Clima Temperado, Experimental Station Terras Baixas, Pelotas RS, Brazil
Corresponding

Summary

We aimed to characterize the weed community in sprinkler irrigated rice, previously applied with residual herbicides for two years, as well as to infer about sustainability of the management applied to the fields based on an ecological approach. The experiment was conducted during the cropping seasons 2013/14 and 2014/15, under sprinkler irrigation. Rice was planted in the second-half of October, using the cultivar PUITA INTA CL. Herbicides were applied in pre- and post-emergence (sequential application) of crop and weeds. Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was planted in winter. In May 2015, soil samples were collected for the soil seed bank study. Phytosociological characterization of weeds emerged from the seed bank was conducted from May 2015 to January 2016, until soil seed bank depletion. Echinochloa crusgalli, Fimbristyllis sp., Cyperus esculentus and Killinga brevifolia were the weeds to which most concern should be directed when growing rice under sprinkler irrigation in lowland areas of Southern Brazil. Their competition strategies are based on density. Herbicides used should be efficient in controlling at least these four weed species. A selecting action of herbicides on weed species was botanically characterized, as the weed species reported after two cropping seasons depended on the herbicide treatment applied.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Agostinetto, D. and Vargas, L. (2014). Resistência de Plantas Daninhas a Herbicidas no Brasil. Pelotas: UFPel.Google Scholar
Aldrich, R. J. (1984). Weed-crop Ecology: Principles in Weed Management. North Scituate: Breton.Google Scholar
Barbour, M. G., Burk, J. H., Pitts, W. D., Gilliam, F. S. and Schwartz, M. W. (1998). Terrestrial Plant Ecology. Menlo Park: Benjamin/Cummings.Google Scholar
Bordeau, P. F. A. (1953). Test of random versus systematic ecological sampling. Ecology 84 (8):499592.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Concenço, G. (2015). Análises Fitossociológicas de Plantas Daninhas – Método Aplicado ao Ambiente “R”, 33. Dourados: Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste.Google Scholar
Goldsmith, F. B. and Harrison, C. M. (1976). Description and analysis of vegetation. In Methods in Plant Ecology, 85155 (Ed Chapman, S. B.). New York: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Jastrzebska, M., Jastrzebski, W. P., Holdynski, C. and Kostrzewska, M. K. (2013). Weed species diversity in organic and integrated farming systems. Acta Agrobotanica 66 (8):118124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mancuso, M. A. C., Negrisoli, E. and Perim, L. (2011). Efeito residual de herbicidas no solo (“Carryover”). Revista Brasileira de Herbicidas 10 (2):151164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McManus, J. W. and Pauly, D. (1990). Measuring ecological stress: Variations on a theme by R. M. Warwick. Marine Biology 106 (2):805809.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olendzki, R. N., Ignacio, A. C. and Mangrich, A. S. (2009). The use of total luminescence spectroscopy in the investigation of the effects of different rice management practices on humic substances of a planosol. Revista Brasileira de Ciência do Solo 88 (5):11471152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oliveira, R. S. Jr. (2011). Mecanismos de ação de herbicidas. In Biologia e Manejo de Plantas Daninhas. (Eds Oliveira, R. S. Jr., Constantin, J. and Inoue, M. H.). Curitiba: Omnipax.Google Scholar
Oluwatobi, A. S. and Olorunmaye, K. S. (2014). Weed species distribution of juvenile oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis) intercropped with maize (Zea mays), okra (Abelmoshus esculentus) and pepper (Capsicum anuum var. abbreviatum). Notulae Scientia Biologicae 6 (4):488490.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pandeya, S. C., Puri, G. S. and Singh, J. S. (1968). Research Methods in Plant Ecology. New York: Asia Publishing House.Google Scholar
Parfitt, J. M. B., Pinto, M. A. B., Timm, L. C., Bamberg, A. L., Silva, D. M. and Bretanha, G. (2011). Manejo da irrigação por aspersão e desempenho da cultura do arroz. In Proceedings of the 7th Congresso Brasileiro de Arroz Irrigado, 461464 Itajaí: Epagri.Google Scholar
R Development Core Team. (2015). R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing. Vienna: R Foundation for Statistical Computing. Available at: http://www.R-project.org/.Google Scholar
Sneath, P. H. and Sokal, R. R. (1973). Numerical Taxonomy: The Principles and Practice of Numerical Classification. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman.Google Scholar
Sokal, R. R. and Rohlf, F. J. (1962). The comparison of dendrograms by objective methods. Taxon 11 (1):4088.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SOSBAI – Sociedade Sul-Brasileira do Arroz Irrigado. (2014). Recomendações Técnicas da Pesquisa Para a Cultura do Arroz no Sul do Brasil. Porto Alegre: SOSBAI.Google Scholar
Vanlieshout, L. and Loux, M. (2000). Interactions of glyphosate with residual herbicides in no-till soybean (Glycine max) production. Weed Technology 14 (2):480487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

PHYTOSOCIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WEEDS AS A FUNCTION OF RESIDUAL HERBICIDES APPLIED TO RICE GROWN UNDER SPRINKLER IRRIGATION
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

PHYTOSOCIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WEEDS AS A FUNCTION OF RESIDUAL HERBICIDES APPLIED TO RICE GROWN UNDER SPRINKLER IRRIGATION
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

PHYTOSOCIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WEEDS AS A FUNCTION OF RESIDUAL HERBICIDES APPLIED TO RICE GROWN UNDER SPRINKLER IRRIGATION
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *