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The Effect of Pruning at Different Heights on Yields, Dry Matter Production and Partitioning in Clonal Tea (Camellia Sinensis) in Kenya

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2008

M. J. S. Magambo
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, University of Nairobi, Kenya
Kimani Waithaka
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, University of Nairobi, Kenya

Summary

Dry matter production and partitioning in old clonal tea bushes pruned and maintained at different heights were investigated. New tissues (leaves, new branches and small roots) consti- tuted a small fraction of the total dry matter in all bushes pruned and initially maintained at 70, 40, 25 and 10 cm high, 36 months after pruning. Leaf/frame dry matter ratio was larger and the shoot/root and frame/root ratios were smaller in the bushes initially maintained at 10 cm than in the bushes maintained at other heights. Yields per unit area of the plucking surface were greatest in the smallest bushes initially maintained at 10 cm in 42 months of recording but on the basis of the available space they were greatest in the large bushes initially maintained at 70 cm.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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References

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