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The reciprocal relation between stigma and suicidality in a sample of patients with affective disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2021

L. Giannelli*
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
G. Cristilli
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
L. Marone
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
G. De Felice
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
A. Carello
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
M. Di Vincenzo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
V. Sollo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
A. Di Cerbo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
V. Giallonardo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
G. Sampogna
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
V. Del Vecchio
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
M. Luciano
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
A. Fiorillo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

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Introduction

Suicide is one of the major public health concerns worldwide, currently listed as the 15th most common cause of death. Mental illness stigma may contribute to suicidality and is associated with social isolation and low self-esteem among people with affective disorders.

Objectives

The aim of the present study is to assess, in a sample of people with affective disorders, whether high levels of internalized stigma are associated to suicidal thoughts and behaviours.

Methods

60 outpatients diagnosed with depression or bipolar disorder according to DSM-5 have been recruited. Suicidal behaviours and ideation were assessed through the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS); internalized stigma through the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale. Socio-demographic characteristics have been collected through an ad hoc schedule.

Results

62.9% of the sample was female, with a mean age of 45.7 (±14) years. About half of the sample had a diagnosis of major depression (54.8%). Patients with suicidal ideation reported higher score at ISMI “alienation” subscale (p<0,05), compared to those without suicidal ideation. Patients with a previous history suicide attempts reported higher score at “alienation” and “social withdrawal” ISMI subscales (p<0,05). Moreover, “alienation” ISMI subscale significantly correlated with suicidal ideation and behaviours (p<0,01).

Conclusions

These results are in line with the available literature, highlighting that stigma and suicidality are strongly correlated. This underline the importance of interventions at addressing internalizing stigma, in particular to those with previous suicidal attempts and with an active suicidal ideation.

Disclosure

No significant relationships.

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
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