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Post-traumatic stress disorder and professional quality of life among psychiatric staff

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2021

K. Yaich*
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
S. Omri
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
N. Smaoui
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
R. Feki
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
M. Maalej Bouali
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
J. Ben Thabet
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
L. Zouari
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
N. Charfi
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
M. Maalej
Affiliation:
Psychiatry C Department, Hedi chaker University hospital, sfax, Tunisia
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

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Introduction

Psychiatric staff could be exposed to various types of violence that might have potential consequences on their psychological balance.

Objectives

To detect post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To assess the professional quality of life among psychiatric hospital workers.

Methods

A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in the psychiatric department of the Hedi Chaker University Hospital in Sfax. The questionnaire study had three major components: the baseline participant characteristics,the post-traumatic stress disorder Checklist (PCL-5) for which a total symptom severity score cutoff of 38 was recommended as the cutoff for a positive screening test and the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL).

Results

Thirty-one participants completed the questionnaire. The sex-ratio was 0.93. The mean age was 41.5 years. All participants were exposed to physical or verbal assault. Physical aggression was the most traumatic behavior reported by 39.3% of psychiatric professionals. A feeling of insecurity when performing professional tasks was reported by 93.3% of participants. Among participants, 41.9% expressed the desire to change workplace. The mean score on the PCL-5 was 21.6 ± 15.35. Five participants (16.7%) had a PCL-5 score ≥ 38. The Compassion Satisfaction mean score was 37.48 ± 5.64. The burnout mean score was 26.41 ± 7.3 and the mean score at the secondary traumatic stress scale was 27 ±6.7.

Conclusions

PTSD could result from stressful events encountered in the course of managing patients in mental health departments. Attention to post-traumatic event interventions may be useful both to reduce the rate of PTSD and to improve the professional quality of life among psychiatric staff.

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
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