Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-f4n6r Total loading time: 0.159 Render date: 2021-05-16T11:33:52.535Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

Nocturnal panic in first stages of panic disorder: Clinical differences between nocturnal vs Non-nocturnal panickers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

B. Rodriguez-Cabo
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
A. Herran
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
M.L. Ramirez
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
M. Carrera
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
F. Hoyuela
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
O. Fernandez-Torre
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
A. Ayestaran
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
D. Sierra-Biddle
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain
J.L. Vazquez-Barquero
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria, Spain

Abstract

Objective:

Nocturnal panic attacks are considered in PD patients a severe subtype of the illness. Recent studies failed at identifying more severe psychopathology in these patients. We analyzed this issue in a sample in the earlier phases of PD.

Patients and method:

A sample of 153 patients (107 women and 46 men) with a recent onset of a PD established with the MINI was included. Patients were free of treatment and had never received effective treatment for their disorder. Data were obtained both from the clinical interview and from specific questionnaires concerning severity (PDSS, CGI), agoraphobia (MIA), anxiety (STAI) and depression (BDI). The presence of nocturnal attacks was assessed during the clinical interview.

Results:

The median time of evolution of the PD was 8 months. The mean age of the sample was 30 years old. Agoraphobia was diagnosed in 66% of the cases and the mean CGI was 4.22 (moderate). More than half of the patients (52.9%) reported nocturnal panic attacks. A positive relationship was found between rate of panic attacks and nocturnal attacks (PDSS frequency: p=0.002; number of attacks in the last month: p=0.02). A positive relationship appeared with agoraphobia (PDSS agoraphobic avoidance: p=0.05; MIA alone: p=0.02). No relationship appeared regarding CGI and scales concerning psychopathology.

Conclusions:

Half of the patients in first stages of PD reports nocturnal panic attacks, which are related both to an increased rate of panic attacks and an increased agoraphobic avoidance. However, nocturnal attacks are not related with the whole clinical severity of PD.

Type
Poster Session 2: Anxiety, Stress Related, Impulse and Somatoform Disorders
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2007
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Nocturnal panic in first stages of panic disorder: Clinical differences between nocturnal vs Non-nocturnal panickers
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Nocturnal panic in first stages of panic disorder: Clinical differences between nocturnal vs Non-nocturnal panickers
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Nocturnal panic in first stages of panic disorder: Clinical differences between nocturnal vs Non-nocturnal panickers
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *