Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-dknvm Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-03-01T10:05:42.931Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Caring for carers: A virtual psychosocial supervision intervention to improve the quality and sustainability of mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian contexts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2022

R. Wells*
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
C. Acartuk
Affiliation:
Koç University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
F. Almeamari
Affiliation:
Koç University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
M. Alokoud
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Gaziantep, Turkey
A. Beetar
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Gaziantep, Turkey
H. Eldardery
Affiliation:
Istanbul Şehir University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
M. Elshazly
Affiliation:
Independent consultant, N/a, Cairo, Egypt
O. Faruk
Affiliation:
University of Dhaka, Department Of Clinical Psychology, Dhaka, Bangladesh
M.R. Ginem
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Gaziantep, Turkey
D. Hadzi-Pavlovic
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
Z. Ilkkurşun
Affiliation:
Koç University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
S. Jahan
Affiliation:
University of Dhaka, Department Of Clinical Psychology, Dhaka, Bangladesh
R. Joshi
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
L. Klein
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
L. Kurdi
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Gaziantep, Turkey
G. Kurt
Affiliation:
Koç University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
C. Mastrogiovanni
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
M. Mozumder
Affiliation:
University of Dhaka, Department Of Clinical Psychology, Dhaka, Bangladesh
S. Lekkeh
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Gaziantep, Turkey
S. Némorin
Affiliation:
NSW Service For The Treatment And Rehabilitation Of Torture And Trauma Survivors (STARTTS), Nsw Service For The Treatment And Rehabilitation Of Torture And Trauma Survivors (startts), Carramar, Australia
K. Nicholson Perry
Affiliation:
Australian College of Applied Psychology (ACAP), Discipline Of Psychological Science, Sydney, Australia
M. Orabi
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Northwest Syria, Syria
J. Qasim
Affiliation:
Isık University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
Z. Steel
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
M. Tavakol
Affiliation:
Koç University, Department Of Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey
H. Ullah
Affiliation:
Independent consultant, N/a, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh
E. Uygun
Affiliation:
Bilgi University, Trauma And Disaster Mental Health, Istanbul, Turkey
S. Wong
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
L. (Fischer) Yan
Affiliation:
John Hopkins University, Department Of Mental Health, Baltimore, United States of America
R. Said Yousself
Affiliation:
Hope Revival Organization, Hope Revival Organization, Gaziantep, Turkey
A. Zarate
Affiliation:
University of Denver, Graduate School Of Social Work & Josef Korbel School For International Studies, Denver, United States of America
S. Rosenbaum
Affiliation:
UNSW Sydney, Faculty Of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

Core share and HTML view are not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Introduction

Mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) staff in humanitarian settings have limited access to clinical supervision and are at high risk of experiencing burnout. We previously piloted an online, peer-supervision program for MHPSS professionals working with displaced Rohingya (Bangladesh) and Syrian (Turkey and Northwest Syria) communities. Pilot evaluations demonstrated that online, peer-supervision is feasible, low-cost, and acceptable to MHPSS practitioners in humanitarian settings.

Objectives

This project will determine the impact of online supervision on i) the wellbeing and burnout levels of local MHPSS practitioners, and ii) practitioner technical skills to improve beneficiary perceived service satisfaction, acceptability, and appropriateness.

Methods

MHPSS practitioners in two contexts (Bangladesh and Turkey/Northwest Syria) will participate in 90-minute group-based online supervision, fortnightly for six months. Sessions will be run on zoom and will be co-facilitated by MHPSS practitioners and in-country research assistants. A quasi-experimental multiple-baseline design will enable a quantitative comparison of practitioner and beneficiary outcomes between control periods (12-months) and the intervention. Outcomes to be assessed include the Kessler-6, Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory and Client Satisfaction Questionnaire-8.

Results

A total of 80 MHPSS practitioners will complete 24 monthly online assessments from May 2022. Concurrently, 1920 people receiving MHPSS services will be randomly selected for post-session interviews (24 per practitioner).

Conclusions

This study will determine the impact of an online, peer-supervision program for MHPSS practitioners in humanitarian settings. Results from the baseline assessments, pilot evaluation, and theory of change model will be presented.

Disclosure

No significant relationships.

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.