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Work impairment in bipolar disorder patients – results from a two-year observational study (EMBLEM)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

C. Reed
Affiliation:
Eli Lilly and Company Limited, Lilly Research Centre, Erl Wood Manor, Sunninghill Road, Windlesham, Surrey, WindleshamGU20 6PH, UK
I. Goetz
Affiliation:
Eli Lilly and Company Limited, Lilly Research Centre, Erl Wood Manor, Sunninghill Road, Windlesham, Surrey, WindleshamGU20 6PH, UK
E. Vieta
Affiliation:
Bipolar Disorders Programme, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain
M. Bassi
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Salute Mentale Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Cà Granda Milano, Milano, Italy
J.M. Haro
Affiliation:
Sant Joan De Deu-SSM, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBER en Salud Mental (ISCIII), Barcelona, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Objectives

To explore factors associated with work impairment at 2 years following an acute episode.

Methods

European Mania in Bipolar disorder Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) is a prospective, observational study on the outcomes of patients with a manic/mixed episode. Work impairment was measured using a Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (slice of LIFE) item and patients were categorised with either low or high work impairment at each observation. Baseline factors associated with work impairment at 2 years were assessed using multivariate modelling.

Results

At baseline (n = 2289), 69% of patients had high work impairment. At 2 years (n = 1393), high impairment reduced to 41%. Modelling identified rapid cycling as the strongest disease-related factor associated with high work impairment at 2 years, although high work impairment at baseline had the strongest association overall. Lower levels of education, recent admissions, CGI-BP overall severity in the 12 months prior to baseline and CGI-BP mania at baseline all predicted higher work impairment. Living together in a relationship and independent housing were both significantly associated with having low work impairment at 2 years.

Conclusions

Work impairment in bipolar disorder is maintained over long periods, and is strongly associated with relationship status, living conditions and various disease-related factors.

Type
Bipolar Disorder
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier Masson SAS 2010

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