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S57.01 - Antisaccade deficits in subjects either genetically or clinically at risk for schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

M. Wagner
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
N. Petrovsky
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
J. Brinkmeyer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
W. Woelwer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
A. Bechdolf
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
S. Ruhrmann
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
J. Klosterkoetter
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
W. Maier
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
I. Frommann
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
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Abstract

Background and Aims:

Disturbances of the oculomotor system are promising endophenotypes for schizophrenia. In two separate studies, we examined antisaccade task performance, a measure of inhibitory control, in first degree relatives of schizophrenic patients (genetic risk without manifest disorder) and in clinical high risk subjects with symptoms suggestive of a prodromal phase of schizophrenia.

Methods:

In the first study, 41 parents of schizophrenia patients and 22 controls were tested with with a prosaccade task and an antisaccade task. Parents were grouped into more likely, less likely, and indeterminate risk carriers. The second study involved 160 subjects clinically at risk for schizophrenia, 32 first episode schizophrenic patients, and 76 healthy controls.

Results:

In study 1 we found an increase of antisaccade latencies and error rates in parents of schizophrenics which varied with inferred genetic load, more likely gene carriers performing worst. In study 2, antisaccade performance varied with symptom load: subjects at risk with basic symptoms only were unimpaired, while at-risk subjects who had experienced brief psychotic episodes (BLIPS) showed deficits similar to first episode patients.

Conclusions:

Reduced inhibitory control of oculomotor performance is associated with genetic loading for schizophrenia, and also with symptoms placing subjects at imminent risk of psychosis.

Type
Symposium: Neuropsychobiology of inhibitory deficits in schizophrenia: An update
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2008

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