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Role of DRD2 and ALDH2 genes in bipolar II disorder with and without comorbid anxiety disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

Y.-S. Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
S.-Y. Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Addiction Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
S.-L. Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
Y.-H. Chang
Affiliation:
Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
T.-Y. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Tainan, Taiwan
S.-H. Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
C.-L. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
S.-Y. Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
I.H. Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
P.S. Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Addiction Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
Y.K. Yang
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Addiction Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
R.-B. Lu
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University & Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan Addiction Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
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Abstract

The presence of comorbid anxiety disorders (AD) and bipolar II disorders (BP-II) compounds disability complicates treatment, worsens prognosis, and has been understudied. The genes involved in metabolizing dopamine and encoding dopamine receptors, such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) genes, may be important to the pathogenesis of BP-II comorbid with AD. We aimed to clarify ALDH2 and DRD2 genes for predisposition to BP-II comorbid with and without AD. The sample consisted of 335 subjects BP-II without AD, 127 subjects BP-II with AD and 348 healthy subjects as normal control. The genotypes of the ALDH2 and DRD2 Taq-IA polymorphisms were determined using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Logistic regression analysis showed a statistically significant association between DRD2 Taq-I A1/A2 genotype and BP-II with AD (OR = 2.231, P = 0.021). Moreover, a significant interaction of the DRD2 Taq-I A1/A1 and the ALDH2*1*1 genotypes in BP-II without AD was revealed (OR = 5.623, P = 0.001) compared with normal control. Our findings support the hypothesis that a unique genetic distinction between BP-II with and without AD, and suggest a novel association between DRD2 Taq-I A1/A2 genotype and BP-II with AD. Our study also provides further evidence that the ALDH2 and DRD2 genes interact in BP-II, particularly BP-II without AD.

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Original article
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2014

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