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Overnight urinary cortisol release in women with borderline personality disorder depends on comorbid PTSD and depressive psychopathology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Katja Wingenfeld*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Ev. Hospital Bielefeld, Remterweg 69-71, D-33617Bielefeld, Germany
Martin Driessen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Ev. Hospital Bielefeld, Remterweg 69-71, D-33617Bielefeld, Germany University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Germany University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany
Bettina Adam
Affiliation:
University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Germany August-Bier-Hospital, Bad Malente-Gremsmühlen, Germany
Andreas Hill
Affiliation:
University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Germany Institute of Sexology and Forensic Psychiatry, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
*
*Corresponding author. Tel.: +49 521 772 78522; fax: +49 521 772 78511. E-mail address: katja.wingenfeld@evkb.de (K. Wingenfeld).
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Abstract

Free cortisol was investigated in BPD patients and healthy controls. A positive association was found between cortisol and depression scores, while the number of PTSD symptoms was negatively correlated with cortisol release. These findings suggest that alterations in cortisol release in BPD are strongly associated with the severity of psychopathology.

Type
Short communication
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier Masson SAS 2007

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Overnight urinary cortisol release in women with borderline personality disorder depends on comorbid PTSD and depressive psychopathology
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