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Executive dysfunction in bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2015

H.Z. Gvirts
Affiliation:
The Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Care Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Y. Braw
Affiliation:
The Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Care Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Department of Behavioural Sciences, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel
H. Harari
Affiliation:
The Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Care Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
M. Lozin
Affiliation:
Department of Behavioural Sciences, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel
Y. Bloch
Affiliation:
The Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Care Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
K. Fefer
Affiliation:
The Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Care Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Y. Levkovitz*
Affiliation:
The Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Care Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
*
Corresponding author. Emotion-Cognition Research Center, Shalvata Mental Health Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel. Tel.: +972-9-7478644; fax: +972-9-7478643. E-mail address:ylevk@clalit.org.il (Y. Levkovitz).
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Abstract

Objective

The boundary between bipolar disorder (BD) and borderline personality disorder is a controversial one. Despite the importance of the topic, few studies have directly compared these patient groups. The aim of the study was to compare the executive functioning profile of BD and BPD patients.

Method

Executive functioning (sustained attention, problem-solving, planning, strategy formation, cognitive flexibility and working memory) was assessed in BD (n = 30) and BPD outpatients (n = 32) using a computerized assessment battery (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, CANTAB). The groups were compared to one another as well as to healthy controls.

Results

BD patients showed deficits in strategy formation and in planning (indicated by longer execution time in the ToL task) in comparison to BPD patients and healthy controls. BPD patients showed deficits in planning (short deliberation time in the ToL task) in comparison to BD patients and in comparison to healthy controls. In comparison to healthy controls, BPD patients displayed deficits in problem-solving.

Conclusions

Differences in executive dysfunction between BD and BPD patients suggest that this cognitive dimension may be relevant for the clarification of the boundary between the disorders.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2020

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