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The consumption of cigarettes, coffee and sweets in detoxified alcoholics and its association with relapse and a family history of alcoholism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Klaus Junghanns*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
Jutta Backhaus
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
Ulrike Tietz
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
Wolfgang Lange
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
Lothar Rink
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
Tilman Wetterling
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
Martin Driessen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538Luebeck, Germany
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail address: junghanns.k@psychiatry.uni-luebeck.de (K. Junghanns).
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Abstract

Thirty male alcohol dependent inpatients without concurrent depressive disorder, 13 of them with a positive family history of alcohol dependence in a first degree relative (PFH), were questioned about their desire and consumption habits with respect to cigarettes, coffee, and sweets while on a three-week inpatient treatment after detoxification from alcohol. Six weeks after discharge from hospital, the patients were reassessed for relapse. Eleven patients (36.6%) had relapsed at follow-up. Relapsers were younger than abstainers. The days until relapse correlated negatively with intensity of desire to drink alcohol, desire to smoke cigarettes, and with a higher consumption of cigarettes. PFH patients did not relapse earlier but they had a stronger desire to drink coffee and eat sweets and had a higher coffee consumption.

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Original article
Copyright
Copyright ©Elsevier SAS 2005

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