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Comparative efficacy and safety of oxcarbazepine versus divalproex sodium in the treatment of acute mania: A pilot study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Ashish Kumar Kakkar
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and SSK Hospital, Connaught Place, New Delhi110001, India
H.S. Rehan
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and SSK Hospital, Connaught Place, New Delhi110001, India
K.E.S. Unni
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Drug De-addiction Centre, Lady Hardinge Medical College and SSK Hospital, New Delhi110001, India
Neeraj Kumar Gupta
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Drug De-addiction Centre, Lady Hardinge Medical College and SSK Hospital, New Delhi110001, India
Deepti Chopra
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and SSK Hospital, Connaught Place, New Delhi110001, India
Dinesh Kataria
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Drug De-addiction Centre, Lady Hardinge Medical College and SSK Hospital, New Delhi110001, India
Corresponding
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Abstract

Objective

This study compared the efficacy and safety of oxcarbazepine and divalproex sodium in acute mania patients.

Subjects and methods

In this 12 week, randomized, double-blind pilot study, 60 patients diagnosed with acute mania (DSM-IV) and a baseline Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) score of 20 or more received flexibly dosed oxcarbazepine (1000–2400 mg/day) or divalproex (750–2000 mg/day). The mean decrease in the YMRS score from baseline was used as the main outcome measure of response to treatment. A priori protocol-defined threshold scores were ≤12 for remission and ≥15 for relapse. Number of patients showing adequate response and the time taken to achieve improvement was compared. Adverse events were systematically recorded throughout the study.

Results

Over 12 weeks, mean improvement in YMRS scores was comparable for both the groups including the mean total scores as well as percentage fall from baseline. There were no significant differences between treatments in the rates of symptomatic mania remission (90% in divalproex and 80% in oxcarbazepine group) and subsequent relapse. Median time taken to symptomatic remission was 56 days in divalproex group while it was 70 days in the oxcarbazepine group (p = 0.123). A significantly greater number of patients in divalproex group experienced one or more adverse drug events as compared to patients in the oxcarbazepine group (66.7% versus 30%, p < 0.01).

Conclusion

Oxcarbazepine demonstrated comparable efficacy to divalproex sodium in the management of acute mania. Also the overall adverse event profile was found to be superior for oxcarbazepine.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier Masson SAS 2009

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Comparative efficacy and safety of oxcarbazepine versus divalproex sodium in the treatment of acute mania: A pilot study
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