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Baseline personality functioning correlates with 6 month outcome in schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Secondo Fassino*
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Andrea Pierò
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Elena Mongelli
Affiliation:
Hospital Complex, “Fatebenefratelli” S. Maurizio Canavese, Turin, Italy AFaR, Association “Fatebenefratelli” for Research, Turin, Italy
Maria Luisa Caviglia
Affiliation:
Hospital Complex, “Fatebenefratelli” S. Maurizio Canavese, Turin, Italy AFaR, Association “Fatebenefratelli” for Research, Turin, Italy
Nadia Delsedime
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Federica Busso
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Carla Gramaglia
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Giovanni Abbate Daga
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Paolo Leombruni
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, University of Turin, V. Cherasco 11, CAP 10126Turin, Italy
Andrea Ferrero
Affiliation:
Department of Mental Sanity, Unit of Psychotherapy, Asl 7, Regione Piemonte, Turin, Italy
*Corresponding
*E-mail address: secondo.fassino@unito.it
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Abstract

Objective

The assessment of outcome in schizophrenic patients should consider both the response to treatment and the recovery of social skills. The aim was to evaluate the outcome and related psychostructural and clinical factors in schizophrenic patients after they underwent 6 months of residential multimodal treatment.

Methods

Fifty-two schizophrenic patients enrolled in a multimodal treatment program were included in the study. Symptomatology and social functioning were assessed with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS). The Karolinska Psychodynamic Profile (KAPP) was used for the psychostructural evaluation.

Results

After 6 months there was a significant improvement in the global scores of BPRS, SOFAS, and some areas of KAPP. The personality (KAPP) and social-occupational functioning (SOFAS) at baseline (T0) correlated with the global score of BPRS at 6 months (T6); moreover, SOFAS at T6 correlated with BPRS and KAPP at T0 and with the illness duration.

Conclusions

The better the personality functioning in schizophrenic patients the better seems to be the response to treatment, with regard to symptoms as well as rehabilitation. Personality assessment might be useful for the individualisation of therapies, even within the context of a standardised program.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS 2003

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