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Two-dimensional kinematics of the jog and lope of the stock breed western pleasure horse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 May 2007

M C Nicodemus*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, Mississippi State University, Box 9815, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
J E Booker
Affiliation:
Department of Athletics, Auburn University, Auburn Athletic Complex, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
*
*Corresponding author: mnicodemus@ads.msstate.edu
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Abstract

Kinematic studies of western pleasure horses are limited and were performed before current changes in the stock breed association judging standards on the western pleasure gaits. The objective was to measure the kinematics of the jog and lope of the stock breed western pleasure horse. Reflective markers attached along palpation points of the joint centres of the left forelimb and hind limb of four stock breed western pleasure horses were tracked for five strides for each gait for each horse. Both the jog and lope were determined to be four-beat stepping gaits. During the jogging stance, the elbow (159.7 ± 6.6°), carpal (179.9 ± 1.1°), fore (227.6 ± 2.7°) and hind fetlocks (227.4 ± 6.9°), stifle (159.5 ± 6.5°) and tarsal (166.5 ± 6.5°) joints demonstrated peak extension. The same joints demonstrated during swing peak flexion with the hind fetlock joint having double peaks of flexion (195.7 ± 3.2°, 182.3 ± 2.1°). During loping stance, the elbow (153.4 ± 4.2°), carpal (179.7+0.4°), and fore (228.3 ± 9.7°, 229.8 ± 10.0°) and hind fetlock (232.1 ± 2.6°) joints of the leading limbs demonstrated peak extension with tarsal peak extension (157.0 ± 9.6°) occurring at lift-off. Peak flexion occurred during swing for the elbow (105.1 ± 3.1°), carpus (119.8 ± 6.1°), hip (83.5 ± 5.4°), stifle (129.8 ± 9.6°) and tarsus (127.5 ± 6.1°). Kinematic measurements will assist in objectively defining the stock breed western pleasure gaits.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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