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Evidence for a high prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsial infections in diverse ecologic zones of Inner Mongolia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2009

Qing-Huai Liu
Affiliation:
Inner-Mongolia Anti-epidemic Station, Huhehot, Inner-Mongolia, People's Republic of China
Guo-Ying Chen
Affiliation:
Inner-Mongolia Anti-epidemic Station, Huhehot, Inner-Mongolia, People's Republic of China
Yan Jin
Affiliation:
Inner-Mongolia Anti-epidemic Station, Huhehot, Inner-Mongolia, People's Republic of China
Meng Te
Affiliation:
Inner-Mongolia Anti-epidemic Station, Huhehot, Inner-Mongolia, People's Republic of China
Li-Chun Niu
Affiliation:
Inner-Mongolia Anti-epidemic Station, Huhehot, Inner-Mongolia, People's Republic of China
Shi-Ping Dong
Affiliation:
Inner-Mongolia Anti-epidemic Station, Huhehot, Inner-Mongolia, People's Republic of China
D. H. Walker*
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 11th Street and Texas Avenue, G.129, Galveston, Texas 77555–0609
*
* Author for correspondence.
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Summary

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A 3-year study of spotted fever group rickettsial ecology in Inner Mongolia revealed that nearly half of the human population tested had antibodies to Rickettsia sibirica detected by complement fixation test. Infected persons, ticks and a high proportion of seropositive livestock and wild rodents were found in all five vegetation zones (desert, steppe, forest, forest-grassland and grassland).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

References

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