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Distribution and virulence of Vibrio cholerae belonging to serogroups other than O1 and O139: A nationwide survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2009

A. K. Mukhopadhyay
Affiliation:
National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta 700 010, India
P. K. Saha
Affiliation:
National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta 700 010, India
S. Garg
Affiliation:
National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta 700 010, India
S. K. Bhattacharya
Affiliation:
National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta 700 010, India
T. Shimada
Affiliation:
Department of Bacteriology, National Institute of Health, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162, Japan
T. Takeda
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases Research, National Children's Medical Research Center, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154, Japan
Y. Takeda
Affiliation:
International Medical Center of Japan, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162, Japan
G. Balakrish Nair
Affiliation:
National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta 700 010, India
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Summary

The distribution and virulence of Vibrio cholerae serogroups other than O1 and O139 in India before, during and after the advent of O139 serogroup was investigated. A total of 68 strains belonging to 31 different ‘O’ serogroups were identified during the study period. With the exception of O53, there was no spatial or temporal clustering of any particular non-O1 non-O139 serogroup at any given place. Two of the 68 strains examined produced cholera toxin (CT) which could only be partially absorbed with anti-CT immunoglobulin G. Tissue culture assay revealed that some of the non-O1 non-O139 strains produced factors which evoked either a cell rounding or cell elongation response depending upon the medium used. This study indicates that serogroups other than O1 and O139 should also be continuously monitored.

Type
Special Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

References

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Distribution and virulence of Vibrio cholerae belonging to serogroups other than O1 and O139: A nationwide survey
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Distribution and virulence of Vibrio cholerae belonging to serogroups other than O1 and O139: A nationwide survey
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