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An epidemiologic study of the fungal skin flora among the elderly in Alexandria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2009

Zahira M. Gad
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology
Nagwan Youssef
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology High Institute of Public Health, Alexandria University, 165 El-Horreya Avenue, Alexandria, Arab Republic ofEygpt
Aida A. Sherif
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology
Ali A. Hasab
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology
Ahmed A. Mahfouz
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology
M. N. R. Hassan
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology
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The fungal skin flora of a sample of 205 elderly persons in Alexandria, drawn by cluster sampling probability technique, was investigated. Pathogenic yeasts were isolated from 18·6% and 10·3% of skin and nails respectively. Candida albicans (16·1% and 7·3%) was prominent. A low prevalence of dermatophytes grown on agar (2·4% from skin and 2·9% from nails) was observed. In contrast, saprophytic filamentous fungi comprised 45·4 and 50·7% of skin and nails samples respectively. This study showed no statistically significant effect of sociodemographic variables (sex, marital status, crowding index, and income per capita) on the skin flora. There was no statistical significant difference between elderly diabetics and non-diabetics as regards fungal skin flora.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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