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Emissions scenarios, costs, and implementation considerations of REDD-plus programs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 April 2011

JAYANT SATHAYE
Affiliation:
MS 90-4000, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Email: jasathaye@lbl.gov
KENNETH ANDRASKO
Affiliation:
Carbon Finance Unit, World Bank, Washington, DC, USA. Email: kandrasko@worldbank.org
PETER CHAN
Affiliation:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Email: ptchan@lbl.gov
Corresponding

Abstract

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17% of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost for reducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how much unsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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