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Chinglish and China English

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 October 2008

Extract

THE ARTICLE ‘Singlish’, in which Duncan Forbes describes the background and nature of the English spoken by Singapore Chinese students, interested me greatly, not only because I always read with great pleasure the reports and discussions on world Englishes, but also because I myself am a Chinese English teacher and teach English in China.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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References

Abercrombie, D. 1963. Problems and Principles in Language Study, 2nd edition. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Crook, D. 1988. “Language Lapses Seen and Heard in 1987.” English Language Learning 197: 3236.Google Scholar
Forbes, D. 1991, “Singlish”. English Today 34: 1821.Google Scholar
Kachru, B. B. 1991. “World Englishes: approaches, issues and resources”. Language Teaching, Vol 25: 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kwei, T. K. 1991. Applied Phonology of American English. Shanghai: Shanghai Foreign Education Press.Google Scholar
Nemser, W. 1971. “Approximative System of Foreign-language Learners.” International Review of Applied Linguistics, 9, 213–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Palmer, F. R. 1971. Grammar. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
Selinker, L. 1972. “Interlanguage.” International Review of Applied Linguistics 10: 209–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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