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Utilizing a Pediatric Disaster Coalition Model to Increase Pediatric Critical Care Surge Capacity in New York City

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2017

Michael Frogel
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
Avram Flamm
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, WellSpan York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania
Mayer Sagy
Affiliation:
Pediatrics, New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, New York, New York
Katharine Uraneck
Affiliation:
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York
Edward Conway
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, New York
Michael Ushay
Affiliation:
Pediatric Critical Care, The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York
Bruce M. Greenwald
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York
Louisdon Pierre
Affiliation:
Pediatric Critical Care, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York
Vikas Shah
Affiliation:
Pediatric Critical Care, Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York
Mohamed Gaffoor
Affiliation:
Pediatric Critical Care, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
Arthur Cooper
Affiliation:
Trauma & Pediatric Surgical Services, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, Harlem Hospital Center, New York, New York
George Foltin
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

A mass casualty event can result in an overwhelming number of critically injured pediatric victims that exceeds the available capacity of pediatric critical care (PCC) units, both locally and regionally. To address these gaps, the New York City (NYC) Pediatric Disaster Coalition (PDC) was established. The PDC includes experts in emergency preparedness, critical care, surgery, and emergency medicine from 18 of 25 major NYC PCC-capable hospitals. A PCC surge committee created recommendations for making additional PCC beds available with an emphasis on space, staff, stuff (equipment), and systems. The PDC assisted 15 hospitals in creating PCC surge plans by utilizing template plans and site visits. These plans created an additional 153 potential PCC surge beds. Seven hospitals tested their plans through drills. The purpose of this article was to demonstrate the need for planning for disasters involving children and to provide a stepwise, replicable model for establishing a PDC, with one of its primary goals focused on facilitating PCC surge planning. The process we describe for developing a PDC can be replicated to communities of any size, setting, or location. We offer our model as an example for other cities. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:473–478)

Type
Concepts in Disaster Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2017 

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References

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