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Using the MCRISP Network for Surveillance of Pediatric Exanthema in Child Care Centers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2020

Aditi Mahajan
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Peter DeJonge
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Sarang Modi
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Khalil Chedid
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Michael Hayashi
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Emily T. Martin
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Stuart Bradin
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Andrew N. Hashikawa
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

Systematic monitoring of exanthema is largely absent from public health surveillance despite emerging diseases and threats of bioterrorism. Michigan Child Care Related Infections Surveillance Program (MCRISP) is the first online program in child care centers to report pediatric exanthema.

Methods:

MCRISP aggregated daily counts of children sick, absent, or reported ill by parents. We extracted all MCRISP exanthema cases from October 1, 2014 through June 30, 2019. Cases were assessed with descriptive statistics and counts were used to construct epidemic curves.

Results:

360 exanthema cases were reported from 12,233 illnesses over 4.5 seasons. Children ages 13-35 months had the highest rash occurrence (45%, n = 162), followed by 36-59 months (41.7%, n = 150), 0-12 months (12.5%, n = 45), and kindergarten (0.8%, n = 3). Centers reported rashes of hand-foot-mouth disease (50%, n = 180), nonspecific rash without fever (15.3%, n = 55), hives (8.1%, n = 29), fever with nonspecific rash (6.9%, n = 25), roseola (3.3%, n = 12), scabies (2.5%, n = 9), scarlet fever (2.5%, n = 9), impetigo (2.2%, n = 8), abscess (1.95, n = 7), viral exanthema without fever (1.7%, n = 6), varicella (1.7%, n = 6), pinworms (0.8%, n = 3), molluscum (0.6%, n = 2), cellulitis (0.6%, n = 2), ringworm (0.6%, n = 2), and shingles (0.2%, n = 1).

Conclusion:

Child care surveillance networks have the potential to act as sentinel public health tools for surveillance of pediatric exanthema outbreaks.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2020

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