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Five-Year Psychosocial Impact of Living in Postdisaster Prefabricated Temporary Housing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2021

Tetsuya Akaishi*
Affiliation:
Department of Education and Support for Regional Medicine, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan
Tomomi Suzuki
Affiliation:
Department of Disaster Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Health Promotion Section, Shichigahama Town Hall, Japan Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Harumi Nemoto
Affiliation:
Department of Disaster Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Yusuke Utsumi
Affiliation:
Department of Disaster Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan
Moe Seto
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan
Hitomi Usukura
Affiliation:
Department of Disaster Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Disaster Psychiatry, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Yasuto Kunii
Affiliation:
Department of Disaster Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Disaster Psychiatry, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Yumi Sugawara
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Naoki Nakaya
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Tomohiro Nakamura
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Naho Tsuchiya
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Akira Narita
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Mana Kogure
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Atsushi Hozawa
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Ichiro Tsuji
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Tadashi Ishii
Affiliation:
Department of Education and Support for Regional Medicine, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan
Hiroaki Tomita
Affiliation:
Department of Disaster Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Department of Disaster Psychiatry, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
*
Corresponding author: Tetsuya Akaishi, Email: t-akaishi@med.tohoku.ac.jp

Abstract

Objective:

This study aims to evaluate the long-term impact of living in postdisaster prefabricated temporary housing on social interaction activities and mental health status.

Methods:

A total of 917 adult residents in a coastal town, whose residences were destroyed by the tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE), were enrolled for the assessment held 5 y after the disaster. They answered questions about their experience and consequence of living in prefabricated temporary housing after the disaster. Their present scores on 5 types of self-reported measures regarding the psychosocial or psychiatric status and their present and recalled social interaction activities were cross-sectionally collected.

Results:

A total of 587 (64.0%) participants had a history of living in prefabricated temporary housing, while the other 330 (36.0%) had not. The prevalence of social interaction activities significantly decreased after the GEJE. However, the experience of living in prefabricated temporary housing did not adversely affect the subsequent social interaction activities or mental conditions of the participants 5 y after the disaster.

Conclusions:

Living in postdisaster prefabricated temporary housing may not negatively impact subsequent psychosocial conditions or social interaction activities 5 y later.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2021

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