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Sensorimotor performance in school-age children with autism, developmental language disorder, or low IQ

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 December 2005

David E Mandelbaum
Affiliation:
Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Pediatrics, Brown Medical School, Providence, RI, USA.
Michael Stevens
Affiliation:
Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA.
Eric Rosenberg
Affiliation:
New York, NY, USA.
Max Wiznitzer
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Rainbow Children's Hospital and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA.
Mitchell Steinschneider
Affiliation:
Saul R Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.
Pauline Filipek
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
Isabelle Rapin
Affiliation:
Saul R Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.
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Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of ‘soft’ motor deficits in school-aged children with either developmental language disorder (DLD), autism (with high IQ [HiAD] or low IQ [LoAD]), or low IQ without autism (LoIQ), and to evaluate the utility of a refined neurological examination to discriminate between these groups. A total of 242 children (74% male), aged 7 or 9 years, were evaluated as part of a longitudinal, multi-institutional study, with a standardized neurological examination that included Denckla's Physical and Neurological Examination for Soft Signs. Most of the scores separated children into two groups defined by nonverbal IQ, with the DLD and HiAD groups performing better than the LoAD and LoIQ groups. Exceptions included motor impersistence and stereotypies, which were more likely in the autistic groups. The neurologists' summary clinical impressions indicated better sensory/motor skills, oromotor skills, and praxis in the HiAD than in the DLD children. Inability/unwillingness to perform tasks was much more frequent in LoAD than LoIQ children.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2006 Mac Keith Press

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