Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-gbqfq Total loading time: 0.187 Render date: 2022-05-17T07:16:07.235Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Reduced visual resolution acuity and cerebral white matter damage in very-low-birthweight infants

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 February 2001

John Paul SanGiovanni
Affiliation:
National Eye Institute, Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Elizabeth N Allred
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Neuroepidemiology Unit, Children's Hospital (Boston), Boston, USA.
D Luisa Mayer
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, Neuroepidemiology Unit, Children's Hospital (Boston), Boston, USA.
Jane E Stewart
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, USA.
M Guillermo Herrera
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
Alan Leviton
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Neuroepidemiology Unit, Children's Hospital (Boston), Boston, USA.
Get access

Abstract

Neonatal cerebral white matter echolucencies predict visual resolution acuity deficits in very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infants. We examined maternal sociodemographic, lifestyle, intrapartum, infant birth/perinatal, and ocular motor/refractive characteristics to determine whether they accounted for this association in infants who were tested once between postnatal age 25 and 56 weeks (corrected for gestational age at birth). Cranial ultrasound scans were read by consensus to identify echolucency in a population of VLBW infants with no known ocular abnormalities. Visual resolution acuity was measured with the Acuity Card Procedure (ACP) in 14 infants with echolucency and compared with that of 81 VLBW infants born in the same hospitals with normal ultrasound scans. In time-oriented logistic regression models, echolucency remained a consistent predictor of abnormal visual resolution acuity after adjustment for covariates in three developmental periods (pre-, peri-, and postnatal). Odds ratios ranged from 19.3 (95% confidence interval, 4.5 to 82.2; p=0.001) to 10.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 81.9; p=0.03). Reduced visual resolution acuity in VLBW infants appears to be due to cerebral white matter damage.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2000 Mac Keith Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Reduced visual resolution acuity and cerebral white matter damage in very-low-birthweight infants
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Reduced visual resolution acuity and cerebral white matter damage in very-low-birthweight infants
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Reduced visual resolution acuity and cerebral white matter damage in very-low-birthweight infants
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *