Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-lfkwv Total loading time: 0.196 Render date: 2021-05-09T21:13:19.859Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Infant developmental milestones: a 31-year follow-up

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 August 2005

Anja Taanila
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Graham K Murray
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, UK.
Jari Jokelainen
Affiliation:
Unit of General Practice, University Hospital of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Matti Isohanni
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Paula Rantakallio
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Get access

Abstract

This study examined the association between infant developmental milestones and educational level at 31 years of age in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (n=12 058). Developmental data (age at standing, walking, speaking, and measures of bowel and bladder control) were gathered from children's welfare centres. Information on type of schooling at 14 years of age was reported by children and parents. School achievement at 16 years of age and educational level at 31 years were obtained from national registers. Those who reached infant developmental milestones sooner in their first year of life had significantly better (p<0.05) mean scores in teacher ratings at 16 years, and at 31 years they were more likely to have achieved a better educational level than slower developers. The adjusted odds ratios for individuals who developed more slowly to remain at a basic educational level (7 to 16y) ranged significantly from 1.1 to 1.3. The possibility of advancing from secondary to tertiary level was 1.4 times greater in faster developers than in slow developers. In conclusion, those who develop faster during their first year of life tend to attain higher levels of education in adolescence and adulthood.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2005 Mac Keith Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Infant developmental milestones: a 31-year follow-up
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Infant developmental milestones: a 31-year follow-up
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Infant developmental milestones: a 31-year follow-up
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *