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Provisioning Western Cape Schools in South Africa with Effective Dance Educators: Posing the Challenges

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2013

Abstract

This paper problematises the training of dance teachers in post-apartheid South Africa. The provisioning of the state primary and secondary schools that offer dance studies as part of the Learning Area, Arts and Culture, with effective teachers is crucial to the delivery of satisfactory dance education in South Africa, where the Revised National Curriculum Statement is specifically intended to meet the diverse demands of the post-apartheid arts environment. The paper proposes that the training of dance educators is further complicated due to the tensions created by the gaps between post-apartheid education philosophy and the realities of teaching, particularly in state schools in the Western Cape.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2009

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