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Covering Complete r-Graphs with Spanning Complete r-Partite r-Graphs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2011

SEBASTIAN M. CIOABĂ
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA (e-mail: cioaba@math.udel.edu)
ANDRÉ KÜNDGEN
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA 92096, USA (e-mail: akundgen@csusm.edu)
CRAIG M. TIMMONS
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA (e-mail: ctimmons@ucsd.edu)
VLADISLAV V. VYSOTSKY
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA (e-mail: vysotsky@math.udel.edu)

Abstract

An r-cut of the complete r-uniform hypergraph Krn is obtained by partitioning its vertex set into r parts and taking all edges that meet every part in exactly one vertex. In other words it is the edge set of a spanning complete r-partite subhypergraph of Krn. An r-cut cover is a collection of r-cuts such that each edge of Krn is in at least one of the cuts. While in the graph case r = 2 any 2-cut cover on average covers each edge at least 2-o(1) times, when r is odd we exhibit an r-cut cover in which each edge is covered exactly once. When r is even no such decomposition can exist, but we can bound the average number of times an edge is cut in an r-cut cover between and . The upper bound construction can be reformulated in terms of a natural polyhedral problem or as a probability problem, and we solve the latter asymptotically.

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Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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