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Treating Survivors of the World Trade Center Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

As part of an established traumatic stress research and treatment program located in New York City, we experienced the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center first as New Yorkers, but also as professionals with an interest in both treating the survivors and furthering scientific knowledge regarding the neurobiology and treatment of traumatic stress. This paper gives vignettes of calls to our program and the treatment of World Trade Center terrorist attack survivors.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2002

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