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Expression of Cry1Ac protein in cry1Ac/CpTI transgenic rice and its resistance in different developmental stages to Chilo suppressalis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2007

Zhang Yong-Jun
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100094, China
Zhao Hong-Ying
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100094, China College of Plant Protection, North-East Agriculture University, Ha'erbin 150030, China
Wu Kong-Ming*
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100094, China
Zhao Kui-Jun
Affiliation:
College of Plant Protection, North-East Agriculture University, Ha'erbin 150030, China
Peng Yu-Fa
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100094, China
Guo Yu-Yuan
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100094, China
*
*Corresponding author: E-mail: wkm@caascose.net.cn

Abstract

The expression patterns of Cry1Ac protein and the resistance to striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) of cry1Ac/CpTI transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) were investigated by ELISA and laboratory bioassay. ELISA results showed that Cry1Ac protein could be detected in all organs during the development process of cry1Ac/CpTI transgenic rice. The content of Cry1Ac protein varied markedly in different tissues at different stages: it was higher in the earlier stage than in the later stage. The highest level of Cry1Ac protein in terminal leaves of the main stem was found at the jointing stage. Thereafter, it decreased at the booting stage, and a gradual reduction to the lowest level was recorded from the flowering to the filling stage, before a slight increase was shown at the maturing stage. In addition, higher concentrations of this protein were detected in the main stem at the seedling, jointing and flowering stages than at other stages. Relatively lower levels of Cry1Ac protein were found in seeds. The results from laboratory bioassay showed high resistance of terminal leaves of the main stem in all developmental stages to C. suppressalis larvae. Corrected mortality values of C. suppressalis at 4 days after feeding on the detached leaves of cry1Ac/CpTI transgenic rice reached 90% before the filling stage and decreased to nearly 60% after the filling stage. Interestingly, results of whole plant bioassay coincided with those obtained in the detached leaf bioassay. The tendency of larval morality in the detached leaf bioassay and whole plant bioassay was consistent with that of Cry1Ac protein content in the different growing periods and organs.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © China Agricultural University and Cambridge University Press 2004

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Expression of Cry1Ac protein in cry1Ac/CpTI transgenic rice and its resistance in different developmental stages to Chilo suppressalis
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