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Takotsubo cardiomyopathy secondary to non-accidental trauma presenting as an “unwitnessed” arrest

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2019

Ryan M. Serrano*
Affiliation:
Riley Hospital for Children, Pediatric Cardiology, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Marcus Schamberger
Affiliation:
Riley Hospital for Children, Pediatric Cardiology, Indianapolis, IN, USA
John J. Parent
Affiliation:
Riley Hospital for Children, Pediatric Cardiology, Indianapolis, IN, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Ryan M. Serrano, Pediatric Cardiology, 705 Riley Hospital Drive, RR 127, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. Tel: +317 274 8906; Fax: +317 274 4022; E-mail: ryserran@iupui.edu

Abstract

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is characterised by akinesis and ballooning of the left ventricular apex during contraction of the otherwise normal base of the heart. We describe the case of a 7-month-old previously healthy female who presented with an unwitnessed cardiac arrest. Workup raised suspicion for non-accidental trauma. Despite progression to brain death, the severely decreased ventricular function and apical akinesis of the left ventricle improved within 40 hours of admission. This report will familiarise paediatricians with this rare cardiomyopathy and emphasise the importance of considering non-accidental trauma as an inciting event for patients with unwitnessed cardiac arrest found to have decreased ventricular function.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2019 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Serrano RM, Schamberger M, Parent JJ. (2019) Takotsubo cardiomyopathy secondary to non-accidental trauma presenting as an “unwitnessed” arrest. Cardiology in the Young29: 442–444. doi: 10.1017/S1047951118002366

References

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