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The relationship between religious beliefs and mental state, care burden, and quality of life in parents of infant patients with congenital heart disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 October 2021

Jian-Feng Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Branch of Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Children’s Hospital, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
Wen-Peng Xie
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Branch of Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Children’s Hospital, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
Yu-Qing Lei
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Branch of Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Children’s Hospital, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
Hua Cao
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Branch of Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Children’s Hospital, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
Qiang Chen*
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Branch of Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Children’s Hospital, Fuzhou, China Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
*
Author for correspondence: Q. Chen, MD, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Branch of Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Fuzhou, China. Email: chenqiang2228@163.com

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the relationship between religious beliefs and mental state, care burden, and quality of life in parents of infantile patients with CHD.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study was conducted at a provincial hospital in Fujian, China. In this study, 114 parents of infant patients with CHD were successfully enrolled. Data were collected using the Duke University Religion Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview, and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey.

Results:

The organisational religious activity, non-organisational religious activity, and intrinsic religiosity of parents were significantly related to the care burden and quality of life, and the two dimensions of non-organisational religious activity and intrinsic religiosity of parents were significantly related to their anxiety symptoms. No association was found between parents’ religious beliefs and their depressive symptoms. Among Buddhist parents, non-organisational religious activity and intrinsic religiosity reduced the care burden and improved quality of life. Among Christian parents, organisational religious activity and non-organisational religious activity were found to reduce the care burden, while organisational religious activity and intrinsic religiosity were found to improve quality of life. There was no correlation between the sub-dimensions of religious beliefs and a negative impact on the care process in Muslim parents.

Conclusion:

Religious beliefs have a protective effect on the parents of infant patients with CHD. They help relieve parents’ anxiety, reduce their care burden, and improve their quality of life. In addition, different religious beliefs have different dimensions of influence on caregivers.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

*

Hua Cao and Qiang Chen are both first authors on this review with a shared first co-authorship.

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