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Percutaneous closure of ventricular septal defect using LifeTechTM Konar-MF VSD Occluder: initial and short-term multi-institutional results

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2021

Masood Sadiq*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, The Children’s Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, Pakistan
Ahmad Usaid Qureshi
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, The Children’s Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, Pakistan
Muhammad Younas
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, CPE Institute of Cardiology, Multan, Pakistan
Sohail Arshad
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, The Children’s Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Multan, Pakistan
Syed Najam Hyder
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, The Children’s Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, Pakistan
*
Author for correspondence: Professor Masood Sadiq MRCP (UK), FRCP(Ed), FRCPCH Department of Paediatric Cardiology, The Children’s Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan. Tel: 0092-42-99231723; Fax: 0092-42-99230358. E-mail: drmasoodsadiq@hotmail.com

Abstract

Background:

Transcatheter ventricular septal defect closure remains a complex procedure with potential complications like complete heart block and aortic regurgitation. The ideal device design for such intervention is still evolving.

Aim:

To assess the safety, efficacy, and short-term outcome of ventricular septal defect closure using LifeTechTM multifunctional (KONAR-MFTM) VSD Occluder.

Patients and methods:

In a multicenre study, 44 patients with haemodynamically significant, restrictive ventricular septal defects underwent closure with the KONAR-MFTM device from April, 2019 to March, 2020. Clinical, echocardiographic, and angiographic data were collected and reviewed. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months.

Results:

The median age and weight were 8 (1.7–36) years and 20 (11–79) kg. Of 44 patients, 8 (18%) had a high muscular and 36 (82%) had a perimembranous defect, of which 6 had mild prolapse of the right coronary cusp. The median ventricular septal defect size was 8.8 (3.9–13.4) mm. A retrograde approach was adopted in 39 (88.6%) patients. Nine patients (20.5%) had a small residual leak and there was a slight increase in aortic regurgitation in one patient. One device, which embolised to pulmonary artery was retrieved, and the defect was closed with a larger device. At a median follow-up of 13 (5–18) months, the residual leak persisted in 1 (2.3%) patient. Mild aortic regurgitation in one patient remained unchanged. There were no major complications.

Conclusion:

Percutaneous closure of ventricular septal defect using KONAR-MFTM device is safe and effective in short and midterm follow-up including selected patients with perimembranous defect and mild prolapse of the right coronary cusp.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Percutaneous closure of ventricular septal defect using LifeTechTM Konar-MF VSD Occluder: initial and short-term multi-institutional results
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