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experience over five years using a shunt placed between the right ventricle and the pulmonary arteries during initial reconstruction of hypoplasia of the left heart

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2005

shunji sano
Affiliation:
department of cardiovascular surgery, okayama university graduate school of medicine and dentistry, okayama, japan
kozo ishino
Affiliation:
department of cardiovascular surgery, okayama university graduate school of medicine and dentistry, okayama, japan
masaaki kawada
Affiliation:
department of cardiovascular surgery, okayama university graduate school of medicine and dentistry, okayama, japan
ko yoshizumi
Affiliation:
department of cardiovascular surgery, okayama university graduate school of medicine and dentistry, okayama, japan
mamoru takeuchi
Affiliation:
department of anesthesiology, okayama university graduate school of medicine and dentistry, okayama, japan
shin-ichi ohtsuki
Affiliation:
department of pediatrics, okayama university graduate school of medicine and dentistry, okayama, japan

Abstract

the hypoplastic left heart syndrome includes a spectrum of underdevelopment of the left-sided cardiac structures, characterized by aortic valvar atresia or severe stenosis with a small ascending aorta and hypoplasia of the left ventricle. without surgical treatment, practically all infants with this complex cardiac anomaly die within the first month of life. since norwood et al. reported successful surgical palliation in 1981, multi-staged reconstructive surgery, involving the norwood procedure as the first stage, followed by a bi-directional glenn anastomosis and subsequent completion of the fontan circulation, has become the established surgical treatment.

Type
original article
Copyright
2004 cambridge university press

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