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Attitudes and perceptions of pregnant women with CHD: results of a single-site survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 April 2017

Aarthi Sabanayagam
Affiliation:
Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart & Vascular Care, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States of America
David Briston
Affiliation:
Pediatric Heart Center, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States of America
Ali N. Zaidi*
Affiliation:
Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart & Vascular Care, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States of America Pediatric Heart Center, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States of America Montefiore Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program (MAtCH), Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart & Vascular Care, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America
*
Correspondence to: A. N. Zaidi, MD, Director – Montefiore Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program (MAtCH), Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Montefiore Heart and Vascular Care Institute, The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Assistant Professor Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 111 East 210th Street, NY 10467, United States of America. Tel: +1 718 920 5882; Fax: +1 718 654 6264; E-mail: azaidi@montefiore.org

Abstract

Introduction

CHD occurs in about 1% of the United States population, and is now the most common cardiac condition affecting women during pregnancy.

Methods

An anonymous, single-site, cross-sectional, 50-question survey was performed at a national Adult Congenital Heart Disease conference to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding cardiac care during pregnancy in women with CHD.

Results

A total of 77 women completed the survey. Among them, 50% (n=39) had moderate and 38% (n=29) had severely complex disease; 30% (n=23) of women were told that pregnancy was contraindicated given their underlying cardiac condition. Almost two-thirds (n=50) report being categorised as high risk for adverse cardiovascular events. During pregnancy, 84% (n=65) preferred their cardiologist to have trained in adult CHD, 44% (n=34) were satisfied with adult cardiologists, and 36% (n=28) with paediatric cardiologists. Only 48% (n=37) were aware that a fetal echocardiogram was indicated. Only 35% (n=27) discussed modes of delivery with their providers, and 70% (n=54) preferred their prenatal cardiology visits at an adult hospital. Up to 85% (n=64) of them had discussed contraception with their cardiologists, and 72% (n=56) felt they needed high-risk maternal–fetal medicine to be involved with their care.

Conclusions

Despite seeking medical care, these pregnant women did not have a full understanding of their condition and their cardiovascular risk during pregnancy. On the basis of these results, further efforts are needed to improve the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of women with CHD in relation to their cardiac and obstetric management during pregnancy.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2017 

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